The application for planning permission to build five houses on land East of Cellar Hill in Lynsted has been refused by officers at Swale Borough Council.  Here are the reasons given for the refusal. 
 
1.  The erection of five new dwellings on this site would introduce a prominent and intrusive form of development which would be harmful to the character and appearance of the countryside and could encourage sporadic development in the countryside which is unacceptable as a matter of principle.  
 
2.  The proposed development, by virtue of its location, design and scale would create development which will adversely affect the settings of the Cellar Hill & Greenstreet conservation area and the nearby listed buildings, which would cause considerable harm to the special character of the conservation area and to the special interest of the nearby listed buildings.  
 
3.  Cambridge Lane and Cellar Hill by reason of their restricted width, poor alignment and substandard junctions with Lynsted Lane and Canterbury Road (A2) are considered unsuitable to serve as a means of access to the proposed development and any increase in the use of these lanes and junctions will be prejudicial to road safety and significantly harm the character of these rural lanes.
 
4.  The proposed development would not conserve, enhance or extend biodiversity or provide for biodiversity net gain. It will result in significant harm to biodiversity and orchard trees on the site and the compensatory measures/mitigation does not outweigh the harm of the proposal as a whole.
 

TONIGHT (Thursday) the planning committee meets to decide whether to approve or refuse the application to build 10 (but ultimately 50) houses on agricultural land East of Lynsted Lane.  The meeting will be held at Swale House, East Street, Sittingbourne starting at 7pm.

All Lynsted residents are invited to attend in person.

The latest representation sent by the Parish Council to committee members can be seen HERE

Swale Borough Council's Planning Committee meets this Thursday (10th) at 7pm at Swale House to determine the application to build 10 (but really 50) houses on the green field behind F J Williams.  This follows the visit to the site by members of the committee on March 1st. 

Local residents are welcome to attend.

Access to the new development would be on the left of the photograph you can view HERE

The Parish Council was very pleased to welcome members of Swale’s planning committee to inspect the site proposed for development of 10 (but really 50) houses East of Lynsted Lane.  Committee members were able to see for themselves the consequences of the plan to NARROW an already congested lane just 36 metres from the junction with the busy A2.

Thank you to all the residents who attended, and in particular to those who spoke with such passion against the plans.
 
Points raised included:  
 
-  no consultation with the Parish Council
-  public access through FJ Williams could mean closure of long-established local business 
-  coalescence between Teynham and Lynsted
-  lack of sight lines driving north or south
-  traffic fumes outside 1 & 2 Lynsted Lane at the ‘Give Way’ sign
-  the new homes will be on higher ground and will overlook existing properties
-  difference between the developer's airbrushed images and reality of the site
-  loss of amenity to existing residents to park their cars outside their own home 
 
The decision will be made at the next committee meeting on Thurs March 10 at 7pm at Swale House. 
 
Please attend this meeting, in order to demonstrate your views!
 
The introductory statement by the Parish Council’s chairman can be viewed  here 

The proposal to build 10 (but ultimately 50) houses on land to the East of Lynsted lane was discussed at the Swale Planning Committee on 10 February.  A motion was carried to undertake a site visit, in order that the committee members could inspect the plot for themselves.

This has been arranged for Tuesday 1 March at 11.45.

The three minute presentation by the Parish Council's chairman at the 10 February meeting can be viewed here

Sittingbourne News has run a separate double-page spread on the Kent day of action to protest against building on grade 1 agricultural land.  The report includes pictures of the demonstration on Lynsted's ancient 'Coffin Path' - featuring a coffin filled with local fruit and veg to symbolise the death threat to North Kent's famous Fruit Belt. 

Read the Sittingbourne News article

An article in Faversham News this week reports on the county-wide "Save Kent's Green Spaces" action day last Sunday.  Around 30 protest groups gathered across Kent to demonstrate their anger at the loss of precious green spaces as a result of excessive housebuilding.

 Read the article here

Around 50 residents of Lynsted (a parish of just 478 households) turned out on Sunday 28 November in support of the Save Kent’s Green Spaces action day.  Thirty groups across Kent gathered on the same day to protest against development on prime agricultural land in the county.

The event organisers have identified in excess of 12,000 acres of green space in Kent that are under threat - although the figure is believed to be far higher as county-wide data is not collated.

The Lynsted protestors met on the ancient ‘Coffin Path’ that leads from the London Road to Lynsted church.  

“Development on Grade 1 agricultural land in this area would sound the death knell for North Kent’s famous Fruit Belt - hence the wicker coffin stuffed with local fruit and vegetables,” commented Julien Speed, chairman of Lynsted with Kingsdown Parish Council.

The group then marched along the Coffin Path and up the London Road to join another protest in Teynham.

Lynsted is threatened with a housing uplift of 60% and a bypass that, in a survey conducted by the Parish Council, 95% of residents oppose.
 
A group of concerned residents in Lynsted and Teynham has launched a new website drawing attention to the Swale Local Plan.  It contains helpful advice on how to respond to the Regulation 18 consultation and highlights some of the points you might wish to consider.
 
You can visit the website here: